a man sat in between two women conducting a video interview

Video Interviews: 5 top tips for interviewing remotely

Perhaps one of the more difficult adjustments recruiters (and candidates) have had to make over the last few months is a total reliance on video interviews for hiring. Video interviews themselves are nothing new, but it stands to reason that the majority of us would prefer to meet a new prospective employee in person before offering them a job – and vice versa.

That being said, with the proper preparation and planning, employers can still learn everything they need from these remote assessments and hire the best talent!

Here are some of our top tips for conducting (and getting the most from) video interviews:

1. Body Language and tone

Naturally, it can be difficult at times to get a real impression of a candidate through video alone. The little gestures and subtleties of body language that we pick up on subconsciously become even more important when we conduct these remote interviews. Indeed, the majority of communication is supposedly non-verbal or conveyed through tone of voice; meaning that most of what we’re ‘saying’ isn’t coming out of our mouths!

With that in mind, try to be as reassuring as you can during the interview. Smile, laugh and look directly into the camera when you can – it can be very easy to forget! Putting the candidate at ease will help them to open up and demonstrate their personality.  

2. Test and check

It may sound obvious, but make sure you’ve tested all the applications and software you intend to use beforehand. There’s nothing worse than having technical difficulties at the beginning of an interview. You’ll be stressed – the candidate will be stressed. Far better to thoroughly check things first!

Make sure you have a backup plan if something goes wrong. Perhaps you can still have the interview without video or over the phone?

3. Be a culture vulture

Conveying company culture outside of the office can be one of the more challenging aspects for candidates and employers alike. Try and paint a vivid picture of what it’s like to work at your company. Highlight your core values and mission statement and share any stories you have of team get-togethers or social events. Likewise, encourage them to visit your social media pages post-interview (if they haven’t already) to get a better impression.

Inviting fellow colleagues (ideally those who would be working closely with the interviewee) to have a short informal chat towards the end of the call can also be a great idea. It gives the candidate a chance to ask any questions they have about the office culture – and gives your colleague a chance to see if they are a good fit for the team.

4. Dress the part

Again, it may sound obvious, but you’d be surprised! No one’s saying you have to wear a suit and tie, but if you expect candidates to be presentable for video interviews then you should show them the same courtesy.

5. Keep others in the loop

This applies as much to your fellow colleagues as it does to candidates. If you want Ian from Accounting or Diana from HR to sit in on an interview or be available for questions towards the end – make sure they know this. Try to give the candidate as much information as possible beforehand to calm those pre-interview jitters. Details such as the names and positions of colleagues joining the call as well as information on any tasks you wish them to perform will help prevent undue stress and panic.

Furthermore, a short follow-up email just to thank the candidate for their time and indicate timelines for decision making can go a long way.

In April this year, we released our own video meetings feature to make the remote recruitment experience as streamlined and simple as possible for our users and their candidates. No other tool or integration is needed! 🎉 Click here to find out more

Share